Own The Night

Studio Album by released in 2011
Own The Night's tracklist:
We Owned The Night
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Just A Kiss
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Dancin' Away With My Heart
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Friday Night
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When You Were Mine
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Cold As Stone
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Singing Me Home
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Wanted You More
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As You Turn Away
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Love I've Found In You
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Somewhere Love Remains
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Heart Of The World
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Own The Night review

Stay on top at any cost

Lady Antebellum needed to release just one album to get all of what becomes an unreachable goal for many other performers who spend countless years to chase a dream, all in vain. The US trio’s sophomore studio effort, Need You Now, released just a year and a half ago, turned its makers into worldwide stars. With this record, the Americans had an amazing, light-speed and breath-taking journey to the top of the fame, and they do look willing to go a step down. However, staying atop might be as hard as getting there. Keeping their heads cold, Lady Antebellum did their best to consolidate their leading reputation. After a long streak of Need You Now promotion gigs, the musicians came back to the studio to make a proper continuation to their discography where not so many records are presented yet. Their third album was given the title Own The Night and a highly important mission on preserving the star status of Lady Antebellum.

Pop folk is the key

The audience knew that Own The Night was to develop the stylistic approach taken on its famous predecessor a while before the album was actually released. Singles Just A Kiss, and We Owned The Night demonstrated the band’s solid intention to keep walking down the same trail, which should be taken by listeners as a great encouragement. Practically the entire bulk of Lady Antebellum’s fresh work is a dialogue between two people bound to each other by a flaming passion. Any track you try is an explosion of emotions, a moment of truth, a time of desperation. There are stories where characters are happy to love and to be loved (Dancin’ Away With My Heart), there stories where they do everything they can to keep the feelings alive (As You Turn Away, Somewhere Love Remains), and there are those where they strive to get rid of heartbreaking unrest (Cold As Stone). The accent on the vocals, the work by Charles and Hillary, who take turns trying on leading parts, as well as the use of some specific instruments like banjo or fiddle preserve a strong folk presence in the Lady Antebellum music. Still, almost each track on Own The Night makes us feel the influence of pop that leaks through many simple and catchy tunes and distinguished hit-like choruses. No doubt, the Own The Night material is crafted well for concert performances.

Hitting the target

Lady Antebellum keep growing steadily and quickly as they follow a distinctly drawn line. The musicians look pretty reluctant to apply any experiments and prefer working in the genre where they feel very comfortable. At the same time Own The Night makes it quite clear that the band opens new spaces for their further advancement. The chemistry between the trio’s members is getting even better, and the new songs are penned so that each of them could show the maximum of their potential. Technically, Lady Antebellum’s newly released long player is not a bit weaker than Need You Now, and all the songs are just as interesting, fresh and emotional. Yet it is clear that the effect is nit the same. Two years ago the band was listed among promising beginners, and the expectations were different. Now, Lady Antebellum releases face strictest demands. Well, the band are not going to upset their supporters, that’s for sure. Albeit not a direct sensation, Own The Night has the right to be called a decent work that would bring an immense joy to listeners.

Alex Bartholomew (13.09.2011)
Rate review4.86
Total votes - 169