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Two Dancers

Studio Album by released in 2009
Two Dancers's tracklist:
The Fun Powder Plot
Hooting & Howling
All the King's Men
When I'm Sleepy
We Still Got the Taste Dancin' on Our Tongues
Two Dancers (i)
Two Dancers (ii)
This Is Our Lot
Underbelly
Empty Nest

Two Dancers review

Wild Beasts, redeemers of indie-rock

The situation indie-rock found itself in the late decade of the new millennium is far from optimistic. Here came the moment when the groups began copycatting each other showing no signs of trying to be themselves. In conditions like these, the rise of a young and audacious band trickily called Wild Beasts in England (where else did you expect an indie-rock act to come from?) was greeted by the followers of the genre as a good omen. There was a reason for that since the band’s debut studio work, Limbo, Panto, released just a year ago, showcased the uniqueness and talent of these lads. Most of the critics, if not unanimously, claimed it a flawless piece considering the lack of experience of these musicians, and urged them to work in the same vain. Seems like they accepted the challenge now. In the summer of 2009, Wild Beasts presented their sophomore long player that was called Two Dancers. The supporters of the British outfit anticipated this work with mixed feelings. On the one hand, a band as strong as this one could not make a flop; on the other hand, the world music history might supply many an example of brilliant debuts followed by disasters. Well, there is nothing to be afraid of this time.

Two Dancers: an album of contrasts

To cut a long story short, Two Dancers is rather an enhanced than modified version of Limbo, Panto. Wild Beasts kept playing in the same manner, yet each accord and every passage demonstrated the professional growth and maturity they have gained since the last year. The beginning of the record is as impressive as it could be. The assembly of the first three compositions from the English band’s album makes you comfortable and ready to listen to a masterpiece. Once you hear The Fun Powder Plot, Hooting & Howling, and All The King's Men, you know that you have put on a record to remember. Skillful at changing rhythms and tempos, Wild Beasts have all your attention focused on their material all the time. If you are familiar with their first long player, then you will definitely notice the most important innovative touch. This time, there are two people on the group singing. Thorpe’s singular falsetto is accompanied by Fleming’s baritone, which makes this opposition give rise to an amazing harmony. Of much importance here is the textual side of the work. There are moments when truly lyrical verses are intercrossed by purely indecent fragments and this, again, helps the musicians reach a kind of contrast that the whole album is based on. The same effect is reached on the musical level in the two-part title song Two Dancers. While the first part is built upon the rising tension created by the nervously rattling guitar, in the second one, the same instrument produces a subtle melancholic melody.

Another big step forward

No matter how good is the first studio work by Wild Beasts, their second effort, Two Dancers, is yet a much bigger step forward. With the discovery of new faculties in themselves and maximum use of the old abilities, these musicians gifted their fans with an interesting and emotional record having many secrets in its music and lyrics to be disclosed only after times and times of listening. It is amazing that the young artists did not lose control after the starting success and continued to evolve with a strong desire to grow professionally and open new horizons in their creative exploration. The Leeds-based quartet is a perfect example of self-development within the frames of one genre. Now that the group has released two proficient albums, we can be sure that it is not a one-day act, but a team of diligent musicians who are well aware of their craft and full of energy and enthusiasm.

Alex Bartholomew (14.08.2009)
Rate review5.00
Total votes - 19


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