Kisses On The Bottom (Deluxe Edition)

Studio Album by released in 2012
Kisses On The Bottom (Deluxe Edition)'s tracklist:
I'm Gonna Sit Right Down And Write Myself A Letter
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Home (When Shadows Fall)
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It's Only A Paper Moon
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More I Cannot Wish You
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The Glory Of Love
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We Three (My Echo, My Shadow And Me)
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Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate The Positive
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My Valentine
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Always
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My Very Good friend The Milkman
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Bye Bye Blackbird
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Get Yourself Another Fool
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The Inch Worm
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Only Our Heats
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Baby's Requst
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My One And Only Love
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Kisses On The Bottom (Deluxe Edition) review

McCartney recalls youth

A musician whose songs have been replayed and remade over a countless number of times, like nobody else, has the right to release a cover album himself. Paul McCartney, as much a living rock legend as a genuine Englishman, did it with in his signature stylish manner, which was well expected. A new record from a Beatle, released as Kisses On The Bottom, brings to the table an exquisite and tasteful collection of covers of old songs many of which were played to him by his father on piano. Enjoying his exceptional status, McCartney feels free to choose any goal and means he wants, and therefore he, effortlessly and without insecurity, afforded a release of CD with very little of Paul McCartney himself. Unquestionably, the prominent Englishman’s vocal parts are available here in a great variety, but musically Kisses On The Bottom can hardly be referred to as classic Paul McCartney. Which should in no way means the record is not a pleasure to listen to, should it?

Kisses On The Bottom breathes the good old times

Even most experienced followers of The Beatles and Paul McCartney in particular will have a chance to feel the grand spirit of ancient times breathing on Kisses On The Bottom, feel how far into the past has gone the epoch of the music that inspired their idol for his own great creative deeds. Even the two songs, penned by McCartney himself specifically for this album, My Valentine, and Only Our Hearts, are stylistically approximated to the rest of the album’s track-listing. The former is decorated by Eric Clapton’s elegant acoustic guitar, and the latter is blessed with the presence of Stevie Wonder and his dear harmonica. However, whereas these two please those who are especially happy about the fact that Paul is still writing his own stuff, other listeners will still like his variants of older material. The ones that turned up really good are It’s Only A Paper Moon, performed successfully by Ella Fitzgerald long ago, and My Very Good Friend The Milkman. Both are lively, slightly humorous, and Paul does his best to perform up to this mood as he whistles at times and sings in a somewhat mindless manner. There are also a couple of more lyrical pieces which are as fine, Bye Bye Blackbird, and More I Cannot Wish You. These are provided with perfect orchestral arrangements to conduct the atmosphere of that epoch.

A nice idea and excellent execution

In all honesty, Kisses On The Bottom may confuse those Paul McCartney’s fans who care not ready to hear or imagine him in a different image. In fact, a jazzman’s part is not his strongest effort. Paul sings greatly and it feels that he enjoys the music and tries to merge it with his voice into a whole, but he would not make in this genre a career half successful as he has with The Beatles. However, surprisingly, the record leaves a totally pleasurable impression. Like any work molded accurately by retro standards with an inevitable touch of nostalgia, this one immediately builds round the listener a world that is no longer existent and thus all the more beckoning. It must be stressed that it is not as much Paul’s merit as the producers’ who executed flawless musical backup with typical low quality sounding. What actually is McCartney’s merit is that it was his initiative to make an album like this one, a fascinating tour in time across the jazz music world of the first half of the past century. This music influenced immensely many of those who still play music to make millions happy. One of those is a magician called Paul McCartney.

Alex Bartholomew (02.03.2012)
Rate review3.90
Total votes - 21