Wasting Light

Studio Album by released in 2011
Wasting Light's tracklist:
Bridge Burning
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Rope
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Dear Rosemary
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White Limo
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Arlandria
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These Days
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Back & Forth
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A Matter Of Time
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Miss The Misery
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I Should Have Known
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Walk
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Wasting Light review

Foo Fighters remarkable credits

Once seen as nothing but Nirvana’s ex-drummer’s project, Foo Fighters have already achieved everything that lies in the domain of dream and opportunities of any ambitions rock-music outfit. Even if it is partially true that in the beginning Dave Grohl used his glorious past I Nirvana to attract the attention to his newly born project, today Foo Fighters can be proud of their own accomplishments. They include both a wide range of studio albums, where there has never been found a single failure, and the band’s impressive concert experience with millions of listeners worldwide dreaming of seeing them alive. Although this ensemble will never walk the path to glory trodden by the legendary Seattle trio, many would be happy to walk the path trodden by Foo Fighters. Grohl himself is now difficult to imagine as a drummer, traditionally the quietest member of any band whom you never get to see behind the drum kit. This guy appeared to have all it takes to make an excellent frontman and a real band leader. The other members of Foo Fighters share the same high level of responsibilities. Their recently released albums reveal no signs of weariness or complacency. Therefore the band’s new long player, Wasting Light, automatically promises a material of top quality.

Rampage and fury of Wasting Light

Long before Wasting Light was put out, Dave Grohl promised that the album was going to be particularly energetic, heavy and solid. He specified that it would have not a song with acoustic guitars, which is something! Moreover, Wasting Light was made in cooperation with Butch Vig, the producer was worked on Nirvana’s best CD, Nevermind (1991). Now that we have a chance to come to grips with Foo Fighters’ new album, we can see that Dave was saying nothing but the truth. This record does knock you off the ground with its power and heaviness. You never expect this degree of vigor and boldness from a band that has many years in this business and seems to have proved everything to everyone. Foo Fighters look and sound young again as if they shook off that wise attitude and modesty suggested by their status. They blew up the silence with what seems to be their best effort in the last 10 or 12 years. In fact, you can easily take the opening Burning Bridge and place it in the set of any album coming from the late nineties with nobody able to notice the trick. The highlights are the sings written by the old recipe offered by Nirvana and perfected by Foo Fighters. The absolute hit number one, Arlandria, unfolds an easily discernible structure, loud intro – soft verse – loud chorus. The same approach lies in the core of another beautiful song, These Days.

Old strategy for new victories

Offering no novel or intriguing tricks, hooks and catches to the audience, Dave Grohl still relies on Foo Fighters classic approach, the straightforwardness of punk rock. Like a natural born drummer, he knows hot to breed speed, rhythm and drive. Persistent heavy guitars, raging from soft to shrieking vocals, and strong drum and bass structures make each song off Wasting Light a perfect example of top quality punk rock. Well recognized and favored by masses formulae works efficiently here providing each track with swiftness and dynamics on the one hand and a nice melody on the other. There is no point bringing all eleven tracks off Wasting Light to the stage as they still have much in common. Yet again, it is real hard to choose even the half of the set because none deserves omitting. In its explosive potential, in its rebellious nature, Wasting Light is especially close to Foo Fighters classic album The Colour And The Shape (1997). These fifty minutes are indisputable evidence to the music youth of the band that is never going to stop.

Alex Bartholomew (18.04.2011)
Rate review4.13
Total votes - 876